Current Issue of the Quarterly

Contents (Fall 2013)

 

President’s Message by Alan Lawrence .......................3

What’s in a Pot? by Ruth Anderson..............................5

Preparing for Fall in My Garden ..................................8

My Garden in Qualicum Beach by Valerie Melanson ..13

Primula tangutica by Alan Elliot...............................23

Mary Delany by Joan Fraser.......................................24

Seed Exchange...........................................................26

Renewal Reminder......................................................28

Membership list .........................................................29

New Members...........................................................35

Officers of the Chapters..............................................35

 

President's Message

Alan Lawrence

 

Two years ago, at about this time of year, I called in to see Mary Kordes way up in the Keewenaw Penninsula in the UP of Michigan. I was hoping to return the following Spring when her Primulas would be in bloom, but events and the late snow conspired against me. This year I did manage to make the return visit, a little late but still in time for the later flowering plants, including a gorgeous pink cowslip. It was interesting to see the back crossing progression; a pink large-flowered polyanthus, a pink false oxlip type hybrid probably with cowslip parentage; this probably back crossed with a cowslip to produce the final pink cowslip. All three were in bloom. As Mary may be moving soon, she generously shared with me divisions of many of her favorites. The majority of these are Heritage double primroses and Juliae hybrids along with a few other rarities. A division of P. abschasica has gone to the National Collection in Alaska, and three plants: the double “Superior Sunset,”
the Juliae hybrid “Kristy,” and a hybrid Mary calls “Kathy.” All of these three were raised by Mary from seed. I feel very honored to be entrusted with this collection for which Mary has great affection.

 

I recently read the Primula section of Norman C. Deno’s book on germination, The Second Edition of Seed Germination Theory and Practice, which you can download or read online from the USDA at http://naldc.nal.usda. gov/download/41278/PDF

 

A few interesting points from this are:
- Most species should be germinated in light. One exception is P. sinensis which should be germinated in
the dark.
- Most species can be dry-stored at 70F for at least 6 months. Notable exceptions are P. sieboldii and P. rosea which cannot tolerate this extended storage.

 

As we are approaching seed exchange season, please collect fresh seed for the exchange, and dry-store it in the refrigerator until you send it, as seed life is extended by the cooler temperature. And if you order P.sieboldii or P. rosea, sow it immediately as it has very limited shelf life.

 

Our newest board member, Merrill Jensen, from Juneau, Alaska, was the speaker at the APS National Show this past May. Merrill is the manager of the Jensen-Olson Arboretum in Juneau. He coincidentally has the same last name as Caroline Jensen after whom the Arboretum is named. He started with the Arboretum in 2007 and runs a very busy program there: learning projects with local school students, special events like weddings and wine-tastings, an annual plant sale, as well as the ongoing garden refurbishment through re-design, garden maintenance and the on-going search for funding.


Merrill has added to the many Primula that Caroline grew in her garden, which is now the Arboretum, and now boasts more than 70 species and Merrill continues to add to the collection. Merrill applied to the North American Plant Collections Consortium, part of the American Public Gardens Association, for the official designation of “Primula Collection”, working diligently with the Consortium’s inspector to list all the species and count them. In September 2012 the Arboretum was approved aas an official holder of the National Collection of Primula. Merrill has more goals he would like to meet. He hopes to establish the Southeastern Alaska Horticultural Education Center on the grounds of the Arboretum as he continues to meet the mission entrusted by Caroline of teaching others about horticulture, natural sciences, landscaping and, of course, more information on Primula.

 

      Merrill at the podium for his presentation at the APS National
Show in May 2013 - picture taken by his wife Kelly.

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